Turkish authorities plan to search Saudi consulate for missing journalist

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It was not immediately clear whether the second plane, pictured here, which left Istanbul for Egypt, was also searched.

He visited the consulate in Istanbul on October 2 to obtain documentation to finalize his divorce; his Turkish fiancée waited for him outside the building, and reported him missing after he didn't return.

Khashoggi was at the consulate to obtain paperwork so he could marry his Turkish fiancée, Hatice Cengiz.

Turkish officials later announced that they believed Khashoggi was murdered inside of the consulate and that his body was transported out of the building.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has called for Saudi officials to prove their contention that Khashoggi left the consulate, as most accounts say the last he was seen was entering the building.

Accusations the Saudi leadership directly ordered the alleged assassination of Khashoggi will put further pressure on the United States and other allies to demand a transparent investigation, with possible serious repercussions to bilateral relations if it doesn't come to fruition. "It is [the duty] of the consulate officials", Mr Erdogan said this week. "They have all of them. Why don't you prove it, you have to prove it". "You have to prove it".

Mr Khashoggi, who was living in self-imposed exile in the U.S. and working for the Washington Post before his disappearance, was a frequent critic of the kingdom's de facto ruler Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, whom he described as a "brash and abrasive young innovator" who was "acting like Putin".

The consulate instructed its 28 Turkish employees to take the day off on 2 October, Turkish daily newspaper Hurriyet first reported on Monday night. I don't like hearing about it. "And hopefully, that will sort itself out", Trump said.

"Right now nobody knows anything about it".

Trump said he had spoken with the Saudis about what he called a "bad situation", but he did not disclose details of his conversations.

"The Saudi Consulate can not absolve itself of responsibility for this incident by allowing its premises to be searched", said Gulseren Yoleri of the Human Rights Association. Riyadh has supported the administration's tough stance toward Iran, a key rival of Saudi Arabia in the volatile Middle East.

What happened? A journalist and prominent critic of the Saudi government has gone missing.

The Turkish ministry didn't say when the premises would be searched, prompting some experts to question the usefulness of the process.

Around half a million Saudi tourists visited Turkey past year while Saudi Arabia is among Turkey's top 20 export destinations. "Jamal was - or, as we hope, is - a committed, courageous journalist".

Saudi Ambassador to the United States Prince Khalid bin Salman, the Saudi Crown Prince's brother, echoed these comments in a statement, adding that his country has sent a security team, with Turkey's approval, to assist in the investigation. "The Kingdom is concerned with the safety and well-being of its citizens wherever they are, and that relevant authorities in the Kingdom are diligently following up on this matter to uncover the complete facts", the statement continued.

"We're not leading by example, and so whenever we make condemnations of other country's anti-press behavior, it may seem like hollow words", Ewen said.

"I don't think I'll be able to go home", he told the BBC, saying that in Saudi Arabia "the people who are arrested are not even dissidents" and saying he wished he had a platform at home to write and speak freely at this time of "great transformation" in his country.

Saudi Arabia has denied all allegations around the disappearance, maintaining that Khashoggi left the building through a back entrance, and said it would cooperate in an investigation.

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