Net Neutrality Is Officially Dead. Here's What's Next

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The net neutrality protections prohibited internet providers from favoring or blocking access to particular products or websites.

ISPs' required disclosures "will allow consumers to make an informed decision about which Internet service provider is best for them and give entrepreneurs the information they need as they develop new products and services", Pai wrote. Even if the bill passes the House of Representatives, it heads to the White House where chances are almost impossible that President Trump signs the resolution eliminating the first major act of deregulation of his administration.

Monday marks the official end of the federal government's net neutrality rules, the Obama-era regulations that said Internet providers can't block or slow down websites, or prioritize their own content over others. Some states are creating their own net neutrality rules, but are barred by the FCC from implementing them.

The FCC's new rules require ISPs to publicly disclose how they manage traffic, but they charge the Federal Trade Commission with handling complaints should they arise.

Internet providers such as AT&T, Verizon and Comcast had to treat all traffic equally. Some consumers fear a slower Internet and higher costs for broadband delivery. More than 80 percent of Americans support net neutrality, according to a University of Maryland poll released in December.

Meanwhile, legal battles against the FCC rollback of net neutrality are still underway.

Supporters of the FCC measure, such as Senator John Thune (R-South Dakota), are confident that any effects on the upcoming midterm elections will be minimal.

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai told "CBS This Morning" that the new rules will provide a "light touch approach" that produces "tremendously positive" benefits for consumers.

"I don't think anything gets better for consumers", said FCC Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel, one of two Democrats on the five-person commission.

Enacted in 2015, the rules sought to stop providers giving preferential treatment to sites and services that paid them to accelerate their data. Lawsuits and "mass online actions" will slow the pace of any changes as companies will want to see how it all plays out. It will head to the State Assembly, where hearings will begin in June and must be voted on by the end of August.

Q. Isn't Congress trying to reverse the repeal?

Other states, including New York, Vermont, and Montana, are using executive orders and various other means of reinstating net neutrality, but at the moment, Washington is the only state to pass a bill protecting it. OR passed similiar legislation, but it won't go into effect until next year, as Motherboard reports. Some states, like New Jersey, Washington, and California, have been actively working on state laws that would keep net neutrality alive within their jurisdictions.

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