Donald Trump's election win could be damaging people's health, researchers say

Ajustar Comentario Impresión

"Elections can matter for the health of children and adults in profound ways that are often unrecognized and unaddressed", the lead author of the article, David R. Williams, says in a news release. That's because hostile attitudes toward racial and ethnic minorities, immigrants, and Muslims-which appear to have been brought more to the surface with the presidential candidacy of Donald Trump-have been linked in previous studies with both mental and physical adverse health effects.

On the other hand, Trump's supporters are likely to be experiencing "increases in psychological well-being, pride and hope for the future", according to Williams and his co-author, Dr. Morgan Medlock, a psychiatrist at Massachusetts General/McLean Hospital.

Following the election of Donald Trump, health professionals said that some individuals who opposed Trump experienced "Post Election Stress Disorder".

Mr Obama's election had been followed by an "uptick in racial animosity among white Americans and a proliferation of hate websites and anti-Obama sentiment on social media", according to a statement about the research issued by the Harvard Chan School.

"Donald Trump's election appeared to heighten already hostile attitudes toward racial and ethnic minorities, immigrants, and Muslims, according to some early research", they add.

Examples include a January, 2017 survey that found a large proportion of USA adults, especially Democrats and minorities, were stressed by the current political climate, and a 2016 University of California, Berkeley study that found an elevated risk of death from heart disease among both black and white residents of high-prejudice US counties.

An August 2016 University of California, Berkeley study of 1,836 USA counties found an elevated risk of death from heart disease among both black and white residents of high-prejudice counties, with a stronger effect among blacks than whites.

The Harvard authors also cite a February 2006 University of Chicago study claiming that Arab women gave birth to more low-birthweight babies or preterm births after the 9/11 attacks "when hostility against Arab Americans was intense".

Writing in the New England Journal of Medicine, the researchers suggested doctors could suggest psychotherapy or medication to people displaying signs of "side-effects" from the presidential election.

Williams is a professor at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and a professor of African and African-American studies at Harvard University.

Comentarios